Does math keep your brain healthy?

Mathematics, especially mental arithmetic, is known to significantly increase brain capacity. The study of shapes, numbers, and patterns encourages one to develop strong observational skills and stimulates critical thinking.

Does math keep your brain healthy?

Mathematics, especially mental arithmetic, is known to significantly increase brain capacity. The study of shapes, numbers, and patterns encourages one to develop strong observational skills and stimulates critical thinking. Professional mathematicians tend to train their brain function. When you're solving a challenging math problem, you know that your brain is working hard.

But what exactly is happening there? Despite decades of research into teaching and learning mathematics, much remains to be learned about how specific brain functions are linked to math skills. Mathematics sharpens your mind, increases your power of reasoning, and helps your mind to be more cheerful and open. The more math problems you solve, the more your reasoning power will increase. By looking for similarities in brain activity when children complete memory and math tasks, researchers hope to establish a link between memory and mathematics.

If you think deeply, you feel that you are everything, and that is the best thought you feel through mathematics. According to the article, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers were able to detect those studying mathematics or not after age 16 based on the concentrations of the brain chemical in each student. This situation allowed the team to examine whether this specific lack of mathematics education in students who come from a similar environment could affect brain development and cognition. Preparation skills include not only mathematics and reading, but also socio-emotional skills such as listening and cooperating with others, which are equally important in the classroom.

The study found that students who did not study mathematics had a smaller amount of a chemical crucial for brain plasticity (gamma-aminobutyric acid) in a key brain region that is involved in many important cognitive functions, such as reasoning, problem solving, mathematics, memory and learning. Unfortunately, the opportunity to stop studying mathematics at this age seems to create a gap between adolescents who abandon their mathematics education and those who continue it. Mathematics requires you to create connections and recognize patterns. This type of critical thinking develops brain muscles, which extend to other facets of life, academic and otherwise.

Mathematics requires abstract and concrete thinking, leading to the development of brain muscles. The findings are important because students in the United Kingdom are allowed to leave mathematics at age 16, unlike those in much of the rest of the world. Studying mathematics can help increase general intelligence by developing important skills such as systematic thinking, problem solving, recognition of sequences and patterns, etc. Recognizing that not all adolescents like mathematics, he said that alternatives that produce the same effect should be investigated, including training in logic and reasoning involving the same brain area as mathematics.

New brain research reveals that through hard work and effort, you can improve your intelligence. Nowadays, you often hear that this is “nature above” parenting and that people are born with mathematical skills or not, but research shows that this is not true. However, mathematics is a recent activity (numbers are at most 10,000 years old), so the brain didn't evolve to think that way.

Louise Simard
Louise Simard

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