Is math healthy for the brain?

Mathematics, especially mental arithmetic, is known to significantly increase brain capacity. The study of shapes, numbers, and patterns encourages one to develop strong observational skills and stimulates critical thinking.

Is math healthy for the brain?

Mathematics, especially mental arithmetic, is known to significantly increase brain capacity. The study of shapes, numbers, and patterns encourages one to develop strong observational skills and stimulates critical thinking. Professional mathematicians tend to train their brain function. Yes, because you gain a greater ability to solve problems and stay focused.

When you're solving a challenging math problem, you know that your brain is working hard. But what exactly is happening there? Despite decades of research into teaching and learning mathematics, much remains to be learned about how specific brain functions are linked to math skills. Mathematics is a science that, based on exact basic annotations and through logical reasoning, studies the properties and quantitative relationships between abstract entities (numbers, geometric figures, symbols). Studying mathematics is a stepping stone to increasing your general intelligence and, with regular practice, you will improve in various academic activities.

Ultimately, by revealing neurological links between specific memory systems and important mathematical skills, the results could help adults better teach mathematics to children with and without learning difficulties. Recognizing that not all adolescents like mathematics, he said that alternatives that produce the same effect should be investigated, including training in logic and reasoning involving the same brain area as mathematics. Mathematics requires you to create connections and recognize patterns. This type of critical thinking develops brain muscles, which extend to other facets of life, academic and otherwise.

The real fun of mathematics comes from mastering, but mastery cannot be achieved without first mastering the foundations or facts of mathematics. Tanya Evans, from Stanford University, demonstrates: “Children who know mathematics are able to recruit certain regions of the brain more reliably and have a greater volume of gray matter in those regions than those who perform lower in mathematics. In short, it points out that you don't do math because you're intelligent; you do math because it makes you smarter. Studying mathematics can help increase general intelligence by developing important skills such as systematic thinking, problem solving, recognition of sequences and patterns, etc.

Preparation skills include not only mathematics and reading, but also socio-emotional skills such as listening and cooperating with others, which are equally important in the classroom. The next time you want to encourage your children in their mathematics studies, teach them to see that mathematics is not a burden, but rather a tool that will help them excel right now. Mathematics requires abstract and concrete thinking, leading to the development of brain muscles.

Louise Simard
Louise Simard

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