How does math affect mental health?

Memory-based math problems stimulate a region of the brain called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which has already been linked to depression and anxiety. Studies have found, for example, that greater activity in this area is associated with fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression.

How does math affect mental health?

Memory-based math problems stimulate a region of the brain called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which has already been linked to depression and anxiety. Studies have found, for example, that greater activity in this area is associated with fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression. Math anxiety affects nearly half of elementary school students. Detect symptoms and use these strategies to counteract them.

Mathematics anxiety has been primarily investigated in educational settings, and research has rarely been linked to clinical research on anxiety disorders. In the systems for the diagnosis of mental disorders (the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), 8 and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), 9, they are not included as a separate category, but prefer to be included in generalized anxiety disorder or social anxiety disorder. 1) Many people who claim to be affected by math anxiety would probably not meet the DSM criteria for an anxiety disorder. However, research shows that math anxiety affects people of all ages in academic situations, as well as on their academic success and well-being.

In addition, math anxiety is different from anxiety in other subjects or from general test anxiety; for example, research on anxiety in related subjects, such as mathematics and statistics, shows that, to a large extent, math anxiety and statistical anxiety are independent of each other and have different effects on students. 10.What if a brain scan could detect the presence of a mental disorder even before symptoms appear? Or can you predict which depressed patients would respond to a particular medication and which would not? Or determine the likely rate of progression of Alzheimer's? Math anxiety affects people of all ages. It can lead to poor performance in math classes. And its effects don't end with graduation.

Throughout life, this type of stress can hinder the mastery of skills or projects in a number of areas that are computer-based. Mathematically eager students (often women) avoid enrolling not only in mathematics courses but also in related fields such as science, technology and engineering. With less exposure to mathematics than their peers, these students tend to perform poorly on assignments and evaluations. They may even have this reaction when they know that the answer is fear, which stands in the way, not mathematics.

However, students rarely leave these groups and often receive very different mathematics education from their high-achieving peers. In short, while many people tend to believe that you are good or bad at math, math is necessary for good health. However, very few studies investigate the interaction between motivation, math anxiety, and performance. Another previous study suggested that female teachers with math anxiety may involuntarily transmit that anxiety to girls in their classes.

. Both in education and in research, it is necessary to evaluate mathematical anxiety and compare the anxiety levels of different individuals. Some also suggest reformulating anxiety, such as asking them to write and think critically about their mathematics-related concerns to help them realize that fear is illogical. And students begin to view low grades as labels that confirm their belief that they simply can't do math.

Math anxiety interacts with variables such as self-efficacy or motivation in mathematics, which can intensify or counteract math anxiety. Math anxiety not only impairs genuine mathematical cognitive processes, but also general cognitive processes that depend on fluency. For the advancement of interventions on mathematical anxiety, a clinimetric framework with a joint understanding and description of the phenomenon itself, of rating scales and indices for measuring mathematical anxiety, as well as for the success of interventions, would be useful. .

Louise Simard
Louise Simard

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